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The London Bridge area is steeped in history. The hospital was the main source of interest for the project but to restrict yourself to looking for ideas and intrigue in just one setting is pointless, and I found the surroundings of the hospital to be just as fascinating as the hospital itself. Taken on the same day as my hospital visit I took in my previous Guy’s Hospital post, here are a few areas around the hospital in London Bridge that captured my imagination.

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The murky Thames water beneath London Bridge

To get to London Bridge itself from the hospital is a good ten minute walk. There is plenty of traffic, both vehicular and pedestrian. Across the bridge takes you out of Southwark, and so I would remain on the bridge, observing the Thames, the waterfront and Tower Bridge in the distance.

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The area is built up and short distances can take longer due to pedestrians and traffic.

Plenty of pubs and bars around, to my joy.

Plenty of pubs and bars around, to my joy.

One of the oldest stations in the city, London Bridge Station still remains incredibly relevant today; the fourth busiest station in London and the U.K. It acted as the main hub for my visits to the hospital. Being situated in Brighton at the time, it would take about an hour to get here. I would then usually head off after my ‘work’ at the hospital was done, catching the tube further into the city, either to meet friends or get a bite to eat.

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The underground station entrance.

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Old brick interior of the station, below the Shard.

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Exit toward the base of the Shard and Guy’s Hospital across the street.

Over 1000 ft high. 95 storeys. The tallest building in the EU. The Shard, designed by Renzo Piano, the spire like structure can be seen all across London. As tall as Guy’s Tower is (the tallest hospital building in Europe), it is dwarfed by the Shard. As a former architecture student I should probably give my critique on it…it’s alright.

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Escalator down from upper level of the station to the ground level. McDonalds and the hospital across the street.

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Looking up the facade of the Shard.

King’s College, London, or KCL, is the third oldest university in England. The Guy’s Campus is directly opposite Guy’s Hospital; convenient as the Guy’s Campus focuses on medicine. It is home to the school of medicine and the Dental Institute, which is actually within Guy’s Tower itself. The streets and roads between the hospital and the campus were filled by groups of students, walking to lectures or off to the McDonalds on the corner.

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KCL Campus. Taken on a Saturday, so not too many students here.

I believe this is Thomas Guy, the founder of Guy's Hospital.

I believe this is Thomas Guy, the founder of Guy’s Hospital.

Allegedly existing since 1014, the bustling, noisy and colourful Borough Market is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London. The photos below were taken on a Saturday morning, and the number of stalls, vendors and shoppers was overwhelming. Fantastic smells and tastes, it was a carnival atmosphere with a bit of everything on sale.

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Thousands, tourists and locals alike, flock to Borough Market every day.

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There is plenty of fresh local produce on offer, and some stands offer tasters and samples.

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The waiting time for queueing customers wanting the famous steak sandwiches at this stand was over half an hour.

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There is enough variety and choice to satisfy anyone’s tastebuds.

So why did I go to the trouble of documenting my exploration when the project was to take place in the hospital itself? Because I had decided what I wanted to do with the hospital. I wanted to create new spaces within, some seen and unseen, some expected and unexpected.

guys hospital collage

Above is a collage I created to illustrate the incorporation of elements from the surrounding area into the hospital. I drew a quick section of one of the towers that make up Guy’s Tower, then began to overlay the image with aspects of the London Bridge area that I wanted to see in the hospital environment.

Cranes were everywhere – London is a growing city, and adding cranes to an already towering skyscraper, bring in spaces to expand the tower, was an ambitious opportunity I couldn’t turn down. When you are given the rare gift of creative freedom you need to dream big.

Ideas such as a speakeasy, an illegal bar hidden deep beneath the hospital where patients can defy the wishes of their doctors to drink and smoke during their stay. Or a performance theatre where the doctors sing or tell jokes in order to gain votes. The more votes you receive, the more patients will want you as their doctor. Or walkways and balconies that came out from within the hospital and wrap around the exterior, spaces of green and light and fresh air to get away from the stuffiness inside.

Ideas that were wacky and strange appealed to me. People suffer and die in hospitals. Without edging towards disrespect and distaste, why not open up the hospital to allow for a lighter, more holistic experience?

A hospital. Boundaries are present everywhere, but in a hospital they hold particular importance. To prevent the spread of bacterial infections, to give patients privacy and respect, to hold documents with personal information, to allow doctors, researchers and students to work in peace.

What stops me from accessing these areas of the hospital? How far can I infiltrate the hospital before a locked door or security forces me to go back? These were the questions that interested me on my first few visits to Guy’s Hospital.

Firstly. Any member of the public is able to get in one of the elevators on the ground floor, ride it to the top and marvel at the views from the 30th floor. Able; as in there are no locked doors, or key-codes, or security guards (not in the lift lobbies anyway)

But. If you are caught up here, as a member of the public, you will be asked to leave.

So these areas were complex. Physically, they were accessible. They were however, restricted areas. For example, the 30th floor was for students of King’s College London only, and there were signs stating this. Up here was their lecture theatre – it would not do for members of the public to bumble in mid-lecture. But there was no one guarding the door demanding ID badges, or retinal scanners, or voice recognition security. Anybody is free to wander in and take a ride to most of the floors. Whether or not they should, is the question.

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A rather simplistic map I drew, to start investigating certain areas of the hospital. I only included a small sample of floors, as including all 30 would have been too long a task. Here, the purpose was to graphically portray space and boundaries within the hospital. Who was using this space? Who could access this space? Who was this space actually intended for? What boundaries were in place to stop one from reaching this space?

And of course, I had to document as much as I could. Below are some photographs that captured my ideas of boundaries, areas that were reachable but not supposed to be seen, and a few shots of elements that just caught my imagination.

As I ascended I noticed more doorways that were blocked off and restricted to me. Some gave little explanation as to why they were off limits.

As I ascended I noticed more doorways that were blocked off and restricted to me. Some gave little explanation as to why they were off limits.

No patients allowed. Welding? An area for builders or site workers only?

No patients allowed. Welding? An area for builders or site workers only?

A Security Notice.

Would a visitor bother going all the way back down to reception to sign in, if they were already on floor 16?

Ho

Straight ahead for Floor 18! Unless you are unauthorised.

Locked in. Old supplies?

Locked in. Old supplies?

Raz's leaving do. Wish I could have made it.

Raz’s retirement do. Wish I could have made it.

Staff and Students only.

Staff and Students only. Door would only open by using a key-code lock.

Low ceiling, creepy looking old door. Didn't stay here long.

Low ceiling, creepy looking old door. Didn’t stay here long.

Uh oh

Phew. Good thing I’m not a patient.

I got the feeling that parts of the upper floor were only used by a handful of people.

I got the feeling that parts of the upper floor were only used and experienced by a handful of people.

An old shaft, presumably for fire

An old shaft, presumably for fire safety. Hasn’t been used in a while by the looks of it.

20 seconds in the lift and I found myself up here.

20 seconds in the lift and I found myself up here.

Gett

Doors to the lift maintenance for the elevators in Guy’s Tower. 

As high as I could go.

As high as I could go.

Fine by me, as it was starting to get a little too high for my liking.

Fine by me, as it was starting to get a little too high for my liking.

All of the above images were captured on a Saturday afternoon. As such, the dental department on floors 18-27 was closed and were empty, with the exception of one or two cleaners. It was exhilarating and suspenseful to experience the hospital in this semi-awake state. Kinda creepy too.